We are always buying postcards and photos from before 1950 - email us at circa1910@tampabay.rr.com.




Saturday, June 12, 2010

SWASTIKA Good Luck Antique Postcards





The swastika was a good luck symbol long before the Nazis adopted it for use as a symbol of fascism.  Victorian postcards often include swastikas as messages of good luck.  In this post, we take a look at some examples of postcard Good Luck Swastikas.  All the postcards in this post date from about 1908-1918.

The poetry on the above postcard introduces us to the "ancient cross" as a symbol of "fortune's reign" and sends the recipient blessings.  This postcard has a golden swastika on top of a four-leaf clover, another long-established symbol of good luck that we often see on antique postcards.



This pretty lady is surrounded by a border of golden swastikas on a birthday postcard with fancy lettering and -  again  - green four-leaf clovers.  The artwork is signed HBG for the artist H.B. Griggs.


            
A New Year's card combines the swastika with holly berries and leaves, plus a snowy country scene to create a holiday image - Sent in all Sincerity - where the swastika stands for good luck without the greeting referring to the symbolism.  On the right are three birthday greetings from a pretty floral set, flowers bursting out of envelopes, enhanced with a golden border that has a swastika in each corner.  Rich embossing on this set, plus vivid colors, make the cards eye-catching.  Below is an enlargement of one of the cards in this bright birthday set.




Victorian greeting postcards that feature clasped hands indicate affection, as shown here with his-and-hers hands connected above golden textured hearts with forget-me-not borders.  Red swastikas at the top corners add another bright visual touch.  This card has rich embossing.  Below we have another greeting postcard with a large swastika - from a set that has a candy-colored border,  golden edge and scrolls on big bouquets of flowers.  This card also benefits from strong embossing.


  We close with a special swastika postcard where the image is surrounded by other positive symbols - a diamond inside a horseshoe at the top, hearts pierced together in Love, the earth representing Life, and a sunrise for Light.   This special card gives us a good look at how the swastika was used by the Victorian postcard designers to send good wishes across the miles.

Price estimates:  The pretty floral birthday cards must have been very popular because there are a lot of them available, so they are not expensive.  Other swastika cards vary from a few dollars to $10 or $12 depending on rarity.  The last card shown in this post is more difficult to find and can cost accordingly.  These prices are only estimates and they are for postcards in excellent condition.


6 comments:

  1. I remember how disappointed I was when I discovered the swastika had a history before Hitler. It's a shame that the 'good luck' symbol is forever dirtied.

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  2. I have the post card that is listed last. Is it worth anything? Hard to find information on it.

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  3. Dear Fed Up - this card can be found on eBay - we suggest you put in a search that will notify you whenever a new Good Luck Swastika postcard appears to keep up on values.

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  4. Dear Dragonstone - Agreed, it is too bad. Many folks are not aware of the symbol's history, including administrators at some online auction sites, who remove older Good Luck swastika listings, declaring them all NAZI propaganda!

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  5. The last card shown I came to this website trying to find some info and a strange postcard I found at a fleamarket. Turns out that is is that very same card shown at the bottom here it is dated 1901 by E Phillips its cool to find out some history about it and that is is uncommon. Thankyou

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  6. This post is so informative and makes a very nice image on the topic in my mind. It is the first time I visit your blog, but I was extremely impressed. Keep posting as I am gonna come to read it everyday! Swastik investment

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